Crafting clogs

The original craftsmanship


The Craft:

 

Miscellaneous:

Trimming a pair of blocks

Chopping axe and adzeThe tools that the wooden shoe maker uses for trimming a pair of blocks are the chopping axe and the adze, both shown in fig. 6. He trims the blocks on the chopping block (fig. 7).
Chopping block and matching table





Removal of the bark

The wooden shoe maker takes the block of wood and places it in the middle of the chopping block. He holds the block a little slanted like on photo 6, and puts his thumb as close as possible against his forefinger to avoid injuries. He then removes the bark with a few precise hews.

The first hewPhoto 6 and 7 show that the wooden shoe maker has placed the block that he is chopping in the middle of the chopping block.

This is something that should never be forgotten because when the chopping axe suddenly glances off, it still ends in the chopping block. This can happen as the result of an imprecise hew, but also when one doesn't notice a chip of wood that remained stuck on the axe.

The one as an example for
                the otherOn photo 8 one can see that the first wooden shoe is used as the example for the second one of the pair. For this a so-called matching table is used (fig 7).

And now the right wooden
                shoeThen he proceeds with the second wooden shoe, in this case the right one (photo 9).



The last step in the trimming process is fixing the heel. Photo 10 and 11 show that a serrated edge has been made first.

Fixing the heelOops! That's wrong!
Its position depends on the length or size of the wooden shoe and the depth of the model. A rule of thumb is that the serrated edge should be made at 1/3 from the rear of the wooden shoe (see also fig 8). The angle of the serrated edge is vertical to the tread.

Both blocks are combined on the chopping block, such that the block that the wooden shoe maker is trimming, leans on the other one. The wooden shoe maker bends his left arm a little outwards to avoid the edge of the adze.

Rough
              measures
Remark: The close observer of photo 11 will notice that the wooden shoe maker is making a very serious mistake: He leaves the axe on the chopping block which is very dangerous. He first needs to remove it because it could fall on his foot.

Comparing
The matching table is used to closely compare both wooden shoes. Besides some minor details, it already shows that both wooden shoes fit together quite well.

One can clearly see which block becomes the left, and which block becomes the right wooden shoe. They have to be each others mirror image.